San Francisco Institute of Possiblity

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Our First Hire!

Artist/ Curator/ Organizer Alita Edgar is joining the SFIOP team as Artistic Director. As the SFIOP expands, Alita will be co-creating new large-scale projects including the Reliquary of Uncommon Experience, and stewarding Camp Tipsy.

2018 touring interactive musical installation and stage, Porch Life

Alita brings 20 years of experience in developing arts nonprofits such as Flux Factory (Queens, NY) and New Orleans Airlift/ Music Box Village. Alita has worked with Chicken John for many years, including on Swoon’s Swimming Cities of Serenissima and past summers of Camp Tipsy. Her CV includes executing international art performance/installations for the Sharjah Art Foundation & Biennial, and other projects involving tens to hundreds of collaborating creators and performers.

More at AlitaEdgar.com

As part of her relocation to the Bay Area, Alita and her sidekick Delta are seeking a new home!
Please email Alita at communications@sfiop.org with any interesting leads 🙂

Meet the Camp Tubsy Judges!! 🎣






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Meet Your Judges!!

Violet & Penelope: These adorable twins can’t wait to judge your boats!

Hal Robins AKA Dr Hal: a renowned underground comic artist, co-host of KPFA’s bizarre radio show, “Puzzling Evidence,” Master of Church Secrets for the Church of the SubGenius, and verbose host of many strange events.

Kate Willett: Comedian, actress, and writer. Recently featured on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert and Netflix’s “Comedy Lineup.”
Cohost of the political comedy podcast Reply Guys.    

Chicken John: Game show host, used car salesman, punk rock ringmaster, grafter, grifter, and sower of discord. Founder of Camp Tipsy and
the San Francisco Institute of Possibility.

They will be awarding totally one of a kind, valueless prizes
for the boat competition!!

Camp Tubsy is this Saturday!!

Name Your Boat & Pick Your Category!

There will be no same-day signups – do it now !!


 


Browse the array of Camps starting at 1pm Saturday
then join the Regatta at
2pm
to cheer on our judges & competitors.
Camp continues until
5pm!

Donate Here for your Camp Tubsy ticket!

Patron Tickets

are now available
for Camp Tipsy 2021!

 

Get Yours Today & help Support 🙂

It's the SFIOP but on Facebook!!

Link

Website

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Tipsy 2019 Patron Pitch

Hey everybody,

Camp tipsy is 16 weeks away! Make sure you mark it on your on your calendars June 20th to June 23rd (but you should come early! Entertainment starts the 17th!). Tipsy is great. It’s the best thing we do and if you haven’t been you should come. You’ll laugh and be happy the whole time. It’s like what Burning Man used to be like before money and art careers and power trips and billionaires.

General admission tickets to Tipsy 2019 are $125 and we plan on releasing them on March 1st. There are some patron tickets available now, for those of you who are of means and love us.

There won’t be any sales or specials for tickets this year, we just dropped the price by 1/3rd and hopefully that will make it more accessible for everyone.

I’m writing this note to you today about Camp Tipsy, June 20th – June 23rd 2019.

This year we have a new ticket system. It’s neat. We wanna lower the price so it’s more accessible to people. So drop it from $180 to $125 We are going to do this by selling 100 Patron Tickets at $250. It all balances out really nicely. If you are a person of means and can afford to buy a $250 ticket instead of a $125 one, you are perfectly within your means to be a Tipsy Patron! Is this something you can do? We would be ever so grateful. We can not release the $125 tickets until we sell 100 of the $250 ones, or we have to re-think the entire thing…
But time is running out:

BECAUSE WE HAVE SOLD, TO DATE, 21 PATRON TICKETS.
If this isn’t you, then don’t you worry, Patrons will step up and we will be releasing the $125 tickets by March 1st. I’m sure of it. We just have to nudge people a little.

Camp Tipsy tickets are here:

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/camp-tipsy-2019-tickets-49611250586

There is extensive information on the ticket site, but you get the general idea. Tipsy HAS to grow if it’s to survive another drought. Or a slow year. Not tons. Just a little. Everything gets more expensive every year. It’s just the way of things. Having tickets for $125 will increase our numbers by 10% or so. New blood. New boats. More fun. Last year was great, but the money didn’t work. The rent at the storage doubled from $400 to $800. Labor costs rose. And this year I’ll have a 3 month old kiddo so I won’t be able to be there as much, which will have consequences…

Things as cool as Tipsy don’t work like other things work. They don’t make rational sense. They can’t be confined to normal systems. It’s a caper. It requires careful planning to create this much Chaos. It’s confounding and confusing.

PATRON
noun
1. 1.
a person who gives financial or other support to a person, organization, or cause.
“a celebrated patron of the arts”
synonyms: sponsor, backer, financier, subsidizer, underwriter, guarantor, benefactor/benefactress, contributor, subscriber, donor;

That’s you! The patron of the arts! Lets celebrate! Please buy a Patron Ticket to Tipsy and see if you can’t think of anyone else who can afford to be a Patron and ask them to buy as well. The quicker we get 100 tickets sold, the quicker we release the $125 tickets and the more people will come…

Thank you ever so much,
Chicken John

Flamenco! An evening of music, dancing, dinner and comedy

As part of our monthly fundraising series of shows for the Camp Tipsy greater community, our yearly Flamenco evening is fast approaching. This year we’ll gather on February 13th in the SoMa along with Mark Smalls our comedian, Daniel Fries on guitar, Azriel Goldschmidt our cante (flamenco singer), and Marina Elena and Kerensa deMars as our dancers.

Chicken John, Spanky, and Genevieve are cooking up a yummy 5 course meal complete with appetizers and dessert.

Whether you decide to come with a date or simply treat yourself, we’ll have you covered. Tickets went on sell this week with three different packages to choose from. But don’t wait too long, seating is limited and we usually have a packed house for the evening. Tickets can be found here. 

Don’t forget to mark Camp Tipsy on your calendars now. June 20th – June 23rd. If you wish to come earlier, you can always buy early arrival passes to build and play with us even longer.

Robin Frohardt and the Plastic Bag Store

We are trying to get Robin Frohardt to bring her Plastic Bag Store to SF! It’s a great project and we want to host it!

 

http://www.plasticbagstore.org/#new-page-1

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hemPPkjH62g

 

It’s a store that sells stuff. But all the stuff is made from plastic bags. It’s amazing. Totally immersive experience, unlike all the crap that all the newly minted “experience designers” are plying. This is what it looks like when a true artist spends years of their lives immersed in their vision. It’s just amazing.

 

Cheers to Robin, she’s one in a million. From a humble (and underage!) bartender at the Odeon to NYC’s most respected puppeteer. We are proud to call her friend!

 

Chicken

‘Goodnight Little Machines.’

Sxip Shirey is at it again. His brilliant producing and composing is bringing forth a new album entitled Goodnight Little Machines. Only this time, his new project also includes visual art, animation and film by artists such as Shaun Tan, Coco Karol, Funquest and many more – all inspired by Shirey’s music itself.

But this can’t be done without the help of you.

The Indiegogo for the new album closes TODAY and we think it’s absolutely worthy of supporting.

So go take a look, poke around his website and be awed by the artist. You won’t regret it.

 

Behind the scenes at the SFIOP,

Stefanie

Last night’s Supperclub with Rachel Lark

Last night we wrapped up our three part series of Camp Tipsy’s Supperclub events. Nestled at a dazzling cabaret spot in SoMa, Chicken and Tipsy friends served up a delicious 3 course home cooked meal. Musings of upcoming Tipsy excitement circulated in conversations where merriment was plenty.

We were delighted to have company of the lovely Rachel Lark playing her ukelele and songs off her Christmas album “Hung for the Holidays.” If you’re a fan of sassy, thoughtful and filthy songwriting that certainly challenges some overrated societal patterns, we recommend giving her music a listen. She had us laughing, sighing while saying “Ooo, ouch” and even singing along with her contagious heartfelt nature. Then again, I can’t remember a show of hers when this wasn’t the case. Ten out of ten, would do it all over again.

If you weren’t able to make it out, don’t worry. There’s still plenty of time to catch some laughs with other Tipsy kin at the upcoming Flamenco and Knotluck dinners in 2019.

And don’t forget! Camp Tipsy tickets make an excellent holiday gift this year.

 

Behind the scenes at the SFIOP,

Stefanie

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Out of the Ashes in Oakland

Out of the Ashes in Oakland, Bay Area Arts Organizations Vow to Enhance Venue Safety and Support Community and Underground Art Spaces

San Francisco, Dec 9th, 2016 – For many Bay Area artists, Oakland’s terrible fire at the Ghost Ship warehouse is a call to action.

“This should be a time for grieving, but artists are already being evicted,” said Courtney King, a Board Member of the San Francisco Institute of Possibility (SFIOP), an arts and education non-profit. “The very community most affected by the loss of life is now facing the loss of its homes and livelihoods. The damage to individual lives and the vitality of the Bay Area art scene is worsening every day, and we must act now.”

In the wake of this tragedy, many of the Bay Area’s artists, musicians, performers, and leading community arts organizations are determined to ensure that the loss of life is not compounded by a loss of culture.

“Underground art spaces are integral to the unique character and success of the Bay Area. They are not a problem to be solved — they are part of the solution to the Bay Area’s affordability crisis,” said Colin Fahrion, SFIOP Board Member. “Safety does not need to come at the price of access to the arts for all people. We can have both, and it begins with community outreach.”

Nonprofit arts organizations in Oakland and San Francisco are now beginning to coordinate outreach and response efforts, including the SFIOP.  The SFIOP board has also formed a partnership with We the Artists of the Bay Area (WABA), a group of talented individuals that has recently joined together in response to this tragedy to help protect the Bay Area’s vital art culture. WABA’s quick growth has been impressive and it is now on track to be the largest self-organized groups of artists in the Bay Area.

The SFIOP is developing partnerships with these organizations to share expertise and create a joint program to reach as much of the community as possible. The goals of this program are to:

  • Connect a network of experienced event managers and place makers to the community and underground art scene in the Bay Area.
  • Offer free, confidential consultations on the state of current venues with an emphasis on safety. The network will offer assistance on everything from managing exits to upgrading electrical wiring.
  • Offer free classes on safe venue development and effective event management.
  • Help educate local governments on the value of these spaces, and the housing problems artists face in the current economy.
  • Serve as liaisons between underground venues and local governments, where appropriate.
  • Encourage regulatory agencies and property owners to work with these all important creative spaces and foster their growth, rather than shut them down.

“The Bay Area has an extensive community of artists who have been running daring but safe events, in all kinds of spaces, for decades,” said Tyler Hanson, cofounder of WABA. “We lead the world in our collective expertise on these issues. This is a tradition to be proud of and a vital resource not to be overlooked. And that is why we are organizing an alliance, to be artistic voice for this community”

Cofounder of WABA, Will Chase agreed. “Working with local agencies, we can make immediate strides in safety while supporting the Bay Area’s diverse art scene. The answer starts with open communication, and a message to artists that their contributions to our communities are valued.”

For more information, contact

Benjamin Wachs
Board Member of the San Francisco Institute of Possibility
benjamin@sfiop.org
(415) 862-4273

The San Francisco Institute of Possibility is a Bay Area based 501(c)3 arts and education non-profit dedicated to creating a sustainable ecology of art: enabling new and established artists, fostering community and civic engagement through art, and perpetuating an inclusive artistic community that lives the art it produces. Since 2013, the SFIOP has produced large and small scale interactive art events in the Bay Area, involving hundreds of local artists.

What Constitutions Can do for Arts Organizations – a public dissertation defence

gift-galaxy-graphic

While many artists involved with the SFIOP already have their copies, the official release date for the forthcoming “Book of the UN” has been set for March 8, where a “dissertation defense” of the book’s thesis on art and culture will be held at the Booksmith in Berkeley.

Many of the theses in the book were initially tried and tested as art events in the San Francisco Bay Area, including SFIOP events such as Camp Tipsy, the All Worlds Fair, and especially The Fallen Cosmos, which has its own section in the book.  (And whose “Gifting Graphic” is displayed in the art above.)

You can stay tuned to this channel for more details about the dissertation defense and the book release, but in the interim it’s worth considering the fundamental thesis of the book, which proposes that arts organizations need to stop thinking in terms of organizational charts and start thinking in terms of citizenship:  arts organizations must develop constitutions, and think of themselves as constitutional cultures, in which rights, privileges, and responsibilities are made explicit rather than assumed.

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